The Maltese Falcon (1941) - News Poster

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Beat the Devil

The star lineup sparkles in this witty, lighthearted tale of a gang of international schemers and cutthroats trying to — well, what they’re trying to do is all but irrelevant. John Huston throws his picture together like a party, for a droll ‘thriller’ that yields off-kilter comic riches. It’s Bogart, Robert Morley, Peter Lorre and Gina Lollobrigida, plus Jennifer Jones as we’ve not seen her before or since. Truman Capote’s sly, unbeatably hip dialogue — reportedly written on the fly — celebrates the underhanded ambitions of greedy fools everywhere.

Beat the Devil

Blu-ray

Twilight Time

1953 / B&W / 1:37 Academy / 94 min. / Street Date January 22, 2019 / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store / 29.95

Starring: Humphrey Bogart, Jennifer Jones, Gina Lollobrigida, Robert Morley, Peter Lorre, Edward Underdown, Ivor Barnard, Marco Tulli, Bernard Lee, Mario Perrone, Giulio Donnini, Saro Urzì, Manuel Serrano.

Cinematography: Oswald Morris

Film Editor: Ralph Kemplen

Continuity: Angela Allen

Dialogue Coach:
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Humphrey Bogart movies: 20 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Casablanca,’ ‘Maltese Falcon,’ ‘African Queen’

  • Gold Derby
Humphrey Bogart movies: 20 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Casablanca,’ ‘Maltese Falcon,’ ‘African Queen’
Here’s looking at you, Humphrey Bogart. The Oscar-winning leading man would’ve celebrated his 119th birthday on December 25, 2018. Best known for playing a tough guy with a heart of gold, Bogart made dozens of films before his untimely death in 1957. But how many of those titles are classics? In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 20 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Though it may sound like a bit of Hollywood lore, Bogart was indeed born on Christmas Day, 1899, in New York City. After a short stint in the Navy, he started acting onstage and in films, mostly in bit parts as gangsters who met the wrong end of a bullet.

SEEOscar Best Actor Gallery: Every Winner in Academy Award History

His big breakthrough came with the Broadway hit “The Petrified Forest,” in which he played a violent bank robber holed up at
See full article at Gold Derby »

Humphrey Bogart movies: 20 greatest films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Humphrey Bogart movies: 20 greatest films ranked worst to best
Here’s looking at you, Humphrey Bogart. The Oscar-winning leading man would’ve celebrated his 119th birthday on December 25, 2018. Best known for playing a tough guy with a heart of gold, Bogart made dozens of films before his untimely death in 1957. But how many of those titles are classics? In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 20 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Though it may sound like a bit of Hollywood lore, Bogart was indeed born on Christmas Day, 1899, in New York City. After a short stint in the Navy, he started acting onstage and in films, mostly in bit parts as gangsters who met the wrong end of a bullet.

His big breakthrough came with the Broadway hit “The Petrified Forest,” in which he played a violent bank robber holed up at an isolated diner with a hobo and a waitress. When
See full article at Gold Derby »

Huston Family Hosts Grand Classics Screening of 'Maltese Falcon' to Raise Funds for Lafd

Huston Family Hosts Grand Classics Screening of 'Maltese Falcon' to Raise Funds for Lafd
“This is the stuff that dreams are made of,” Humphry Bogart mutters in the gruff, stoic voice of his character, Sam Spade, from the iconic John Huston film The Maltese Falcon. The 1941 noir picture was shown Wednesday night as part of the Grand Classics film screening series, hosted by Huston’s children, Anjelica and Danny, as well as his grandson, Jack, and co-hosted by Petter Neby, founder of Punkt.

The VIP screening was held in the sleek, upscale iPic Theatre in Westwood. Just before the movie began, there was the convivial murmur of small talk as the ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Tennessee Williams' '"The Night Of The Iguana": An Analysis Of John Huston's 1963 Film

  • CinemaRetro
"The Night Of The Iguana: Close Encounters In The Jungle"

By Eve Goldberg

The Night of the Iguana, Tennessee Williams’s last great play, was turned into a 1964 movie which, in its day, was as famous for its behind-the-scenes spectacle as for what actually appeared on screen.

Today, Iguana is rarely mentioned alongside the other classic Tennessee Williams film adaptations: Streetcar Named Desire, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, and Suddenly, Last Summer. Despite a tremendously talented cast, compelling characters, and a can’t-look-away examination of our anguished, redeemable humanity, Iguana is often neglected.

So, it’s high time for a fresh look at this movie — with a focus on its journey from stage to screen.

The Play

"Shannon!" shouts Maxine Faulk from the veranda of her run-down hotel on the coast of Mexico. Thus opens Tennessee Williams’ 1961 play. The setting is 1940. Recently widowed Maxine greets her old friend, Reverend Shannon,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

FilmStruck Shutdown: Directors, Fans React to End of Cinephile Streaming Service

  • Variety
On the news that FilmStruck has been struck down, fans — including Hollywood directors Barry Jenkins, Guillermo del Toro and Rian Johnson — vented their shock, sadness and anger on social media.

FilmStruck will cease operations on Nov. 29 after two years in operation, Turner and Warner Bros. Digital Networks announced Friday. The move comes amid a strategic shift to mainstream direct-to-consumer entertainment services by WarnerMedia, which is now owned by At&T.

The service hosted hundreds of classic, arthouse, indie and foreign films — many of them exclusively, including titles from the Criterion Collection catalog.

Jenkins, Oscar-winning director of “Moonlight,” initially tweeted a one-word, all-caps reaction to FilmStruck’s imminent closure: “F—.”

He followed with a more thoughtful post, saying about the FilmStruck team, “these were flesh and blood people who really, truly cared about the work they were doing and the people who made and appreciated film.”

Like… I went into @FilmStruck a
See full article at Variety »

Madeline Kahn movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Young Frankenstein,’ ‘Blazing Saddles’

  • Gold Derby
Madeline Kahn movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Young Frankenstein,’ ‘Blazing Saddles’
We lost Madeline Kahn, a farceur extraordinaire, far too soon. And her list of film appearances, especially ones that fully showcase her unique comedic talents, is tragically short. But thank goodness for that marvelously mad Mel Brooks for letting her loose in a quartet of some of the most gut-bustingly funny female performances in cinematic history.

Kahn, who passed away at age 57 in 1999, would have celebrated her 76th birthday on September 29. What better way to salute her legacy on the big screen than to recall the two-time Oscar nominee’s 12 greatest movies, ranked from worst to best. Our photo gallery above includes “Blazing Saddles,” “What’s Up, Doc?” and “Young Frankenstein.”

SEEWhich 15 People Have the Egot?

12. History Of The World, Part 1 (1981)

There is a reason that there never was a “Part 2.” This slapdash episodic burlesque of eras past ranging from the Stone Age to the Spanish Inquisition finds Kahn as
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘Brick’ Parody Addresses ‘The Last Jedi’ Controversies Using Imagery From Rian Johnson’s First Film

‘Brick’ Parody Addresses ‘The Last Jedi’ Controversies Using Imagery From Rian Johnson’s First Film
In 2005, Rian Johnson burst onto the indie film scene with Brick, a stylish film noir inspired by the writings of author Dashiell Hammett (The Maltese Falcon). 12 years and several films later, Johnson released Star Wars: The Last Jedi, the most divisive film in the franchise thus far. Now a group of fans has […]

The post ‘Brick’ Parody Addresses ‘The Last Jedi’ Controversies Using Imagery From Rian Johnson’s First Film appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

'The MacKintosh Man': THR's 1973 Review

'The MacKintosh Man': THR's 1973 Review
On July 25, 1973, Warner Bros.' Paul Newman thriller The Mackintosh Man opened in New York at Loews theaters. The Hollywood Reporter's original review is below: 

The Mackintosh Man, produced by John Foreman and directed by John Huston, is a good genre film in the ice cold vein of The Maltese Falcon. It isn't nearly as rich nor fine as that early Huston classic but tells an interesting story with a sure sense of atmosphere, location and supporting characters. 

Paul Newman plays an American who appears to be an international jewel thief betrayed by his employer Harry Andrews ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

‘The Crown’ Star Vanessa Kirby on ‘Colorful’ Princess Margaret, ‘Mission: Impossible’

  • Variety
‘The Crown’ Star Vanessa Kirby on ‘Colorful’ Princess Margaret, ‘Mission: Impossible’
There’s nothing prim and proper about Vanessa Kirby’s Princess Margaret, who smoked, drank and fearlessly flirted her way through the first two seasons of “The Crown,” earning her an Emmy nom. But now Kirby is getting to show off her action chops as the latest femme fatale in “Mission: Impossible — Fallout,” opposite Tom Cruise, which will be released July 27. “I’m so clumsy, I wasn’t sure if I could be [an action star],” says Kirby. “But there’s something incredibly liberating and exhilarating about pretending to kill people with knives.”

How has playing Princess Margaret changed your career?

She’s given me so much, really. It was just such an amazing thing to play somebody who’s so colorful and so vivid. There’s not that many parts like that, that are in full multicolor or have vibrancy. To play somebody that has such a range of feelings and depth and such extremes of feelings.
See full article at Variety »

The Ten Most Important MacGuffins in the History of Cinema

  • Cinelinx
A MacGuffin is basically a gimmick utilized by a screenwriter to create motivation for a film’s characters. Here’s a look at ten MacGuffins that have transcended their stigma to become something much more important and influential.

During a discussion about one of his films, Alfred Hitchcock used the term “MacGuffin” to describe one of his techniques. He explained it succinctly as, “the device, the gimmick, if you will...In crook stories it is almost always the necklace, and in spy stories it is most always the papers." A MacGuffin can be an object, a person, a place, or an event. In most cases, it is something that the film’s primary characters are looking for. However, the exact nature of a MacGuffin is not supposed to be overly important to the audience. In reality, the MacGuffin has hardly any substance beyond its purpose on screen, it is irrelevant
See full article at Cinelinx »

‘Grim Fandango Remastered’ And ‘Broken Age’ Are Coming to Switch

  • Variety
“Grim Fandango Remastered” and “Broken Age” are coming to the Nintendo Switch, Double Fine ProductionsTim Schafer announced during the E3 2018 Coliseum event on Tuesday.

“Grim Fandango” is a classic point-and-click adventure game released by LucasArts on PC in 1998. Heavily inspired by films like “Casablanca” and “The Maltese Falcon,” as well as Aztec folklore, it tells the story of Manny Calavera and his search a woman named Meche in the Land of the Dead. It was the first LucasArts adventure game to use 3D computer graphics on pre-rendered backgrounds. Double Fine released the remastered version in 2015 with updated visuals, a re-recorded score with a full live orchestra, and a director’s’ commentary.

“Broken Age,” meanwhile, launched in two parts in 2014 and 2015 and was Tim Schafer’s first return to the point-and-click adventure genre since “Grim Fandango.” Double Fine ran a Kickstarter campaign for the game in 2012 and it quickly became
See full article at Variety »

When Humphrey Bogart Tackled Movie Censorship in 1941

When Humphrey Bogart Tackled Movie Censorship in 1941
In October 1941, weeks after the fall release of his noir classic The Maltese Falcon, silver screen star Humphrey Bogart wrote an essay addressing critics of movie violence and those who've called for censorship in studio productions. Bogart's original essay in The Hollywood Reporter is below. 

The blanket of censorship covers practically every country in the world these days, except our own. And, judging from the editorials, whenever the threat of censorship rears its head in this country, most of us seem agreed it is the Number One enemy of a free democracy. 

This is ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

How Much Shock Can You Stand?

Ghosts are famous for their flexibility, spiraling through keyholes and up from the floorboards in search of their next mark. But movies about ghosts can be flexible too. Three classics of the genre, The Uninvited, House on Haunted Hill and The Innocents, demonstrate that there’s more than one way haunt a house.

These films never appeared on any triple bill that I know of, but I’d like to think they did, somewhere in some small town with a theater manager that knew a good scare when he saw it. How could the programmer resist it? Each film is united by a beautiful black and white sheen, eerie locales and their ability to scare the bejeezus out of you. But they’re also alike in their differences, coming at their specters from distinctly different vantage points.

1944’s The Uninvited, a three-hankie haunted house tale with a dysfunctional family subplot,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Gremlins Poster Contains 84 Hidden Pop Culture References

Take a good long look at this picture and see if you can find all 84 items. It’s a little tough if you don’t know your pop culture but if you do then you might find a whole slew of things that can spark your interest and get you excited about finding more and more throughout the picture that just seem to pop out at you and make themselves known. This is how many I managed to find after about a minute of looking, but there are So many more. Sword of Omens-Thundercats Maltese Falcon-The Maltese Falcon Greedo and Hammerhead-Star

Gremlins Poster Contains 84 Hidden Pop Culture References
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Neo Noir Pays Homage to Welles' Crime Drama and Other Classics of the '40s and '50s

Neo Noir Pays Homage to Welles' Crime Drama and Other Classics of the '40s and '50s
Trouble Is My Business with Brittney Powell. Co-written by actor/voice actor Tom Konkle, who also directed, and Xena: Warrior Princess actress Brittney Powell, Trouble Is My Business is a humorous homage to film noirs of the 1940s and 1950s, among them John Huston's The Maltese Falcon and Orson Welles' Touch of Evil. Konkle stars in the sort of role that back in the '40s and '50s belonged to the likes of Humphrey Bogart, Robert Mitchum, Dick Powell, and Alan Ladd. As the femme fatale, Brittney Powell is supposed to evoke memories of Jane Greer, Lizabeth Scott, Lauren Bacall, and Claire Trevor. 'Trouble Is My Business': Humorous film noir homage evokes memories of 'The Maltese Falcon' & 'Touch of Evil' A crunchy, witty, and often just plain funny mash-up of classic noir tropes, from hard-boiled private dicks to the easy-on-the-eyes femme fatales – in addition to dialogue worthy of Dashiell Hammett and, occasionally
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

From VHS to VOD #3

I don’t know if you’re anything like me, but I can often spend hours upon hours trawling through iTunes looking for new movies to buy… Usually I’ll randomly come across a title I haven’t seen in years and use the “Cast & Crew” links to make my way down the rabbit hole to the more obscure side of Apple’s digital movie service.

Now whilst many will decry that iTunes is a terrible VOD service due to Apple’s desire to lock its audience to their platforms, if you have an Apple TV or iPad be aware – there are some truly obscure films hidden away in the depths of the vast collection of movies. Some of which have been made available in the UK for the first time since VHS and a Lot that have been added to the service in their original uncut form!

So, with
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

10 Boxing Movies to Get You Hyped for Mayweather-McGregor

10 Boxing Movies to Get You Hyped for Mayweather-McGregor
The drama outside of the ring has been like something from a movie, with each fighter bragging and boasting about what's going to happen when Conor McGregor fights Floyd Mayweather in Las Vegas on August 26. You've seen the press events, you've heard from the pundits, now there's nothing to do except countdown to the big day and binge watch these boxing movies. Yes, we've put together a list of 10 boxing movies to make you hyped for Mayweather Vs. McGregor, a real life contest the size of Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice.

In one corner, we've got the eleven-time five-division professional boxing world champion, with 49 wins and zero losses, Floyd Mayweather! In the other corner, it's Ufc champion, mega-star, and pro boxing underdog, Conor McGregor. It's been called "The Money Fight" and with good reason. First of all, it will be a huge payday for both fighters. But furthermore, while
See full article at MovieWeb »

Volcano is Fearless Finney Showcase: L.A. Screening with Bisset in Attendance

Volcano is Fearless Finney Showcase: L.A. Screening with Bisset in Attendance
'Under the Volcano' screening: John Huston's 'quality' comeback featuring daring Albert Finney tour de force As part of its John Huston film series, the UCLA Film & Television Archive will be presenting the 1984 drama Under the Volcano, starring Albert Finney, Jacqueline Bisset, and Anthony Andrews, on July 21 at 7:30 p.m. at the Billy Wilder Theater in the Los Angeles suburb of Westwood. Jacqueline Bisset is expected to be in attendance. Huston was 77, and suffering from emphysema for several years, when he returned to Mexico – the setting of both The Treasure of the Sierra Madre and The Night of the Iguana – to direct 28-year-old newcomer Guy Gallo's adaptation of English poet and novelist Malcolm Lowry's 1947 semi-autobiographical novel Under the Volcano, which until then had reportedly defied the screenwriting abilities of numerous professionals. Appropriately set on the Day of the Dead – 1938 – in the fictitious Mexican town of Quauhnahuac (the fact that it sounds like Cuernavaca
See full article at Alt Film Guide »
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